Sunday, 19 February 2017

American Style Cornbread (Wheat Free, with Dairy Free Option)

I was feeling ill yesterday and avoiding college work, and still am right now! Although I have finished my 2000 word essay, I still have about a million blogs left over and a 20 second short animation. To say I feel overwhelmed is an understatement.


But yesterday, I was wrapped up in a blankie on the sofa, bingefesting Netflix true crime documentaries, and wishing I felt better. So, I decided to try something simple, a kind of mix-it-all-together-in-one-bowl simple.

I found inspiration in a strange place: recently, I moved in with my beloved companion, and had to move the contents of my kitchen cupboards. In the process, I rediscovered some ingredients that I hadn't had the change to use in my previous abode, one of which was a jar of fine cornmeal. I had actually bought it from the Polish shop, where it is called kasza kukurydziana, a year or so ago, and seeing as it was in a jar I had no idea of its sell-by date, but it didn't kill me so it must still be good.


The sight of the beautiful sunny golden hue of the cornmeal inspired me to make a Southern United States staple. It's something I always see in African American TV and films, and I've always been attracted to it as a food. So, I turned to one of my go-to cookery books, 1000 Recipes: From deliciously light snacks to fabulous gourmet dishes, by Martha Day (Anness Publishing Limited, London. 1997), however the recipe was pretty much exclusively butter. I improvised, using a few recipes I sourced on recipe forums (like AllRecipes UK) to make a version using sunflower oil, and much less than suggested.

Although it is called bread, don't be fooled! It's more like a cake, or a tea bread. I certainly wouldn't eat it like bread, but then again I have no idea how it's eaten by people in the Deep South where it originated.


INGREDIMENTS
For one loaf

  • 4 ounces (115 grammes) white spelt flour
  • 6 ounces (170 grammes) fine cornmeal
  • 2 ounces (55 grammes) caster sugar
  • 1 tablespoon (15 millilitres) baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 6 fluid ounces (180 millilitres) milk, or milk alternative
  • 3 ounces (85 grammes) sunflower oil
  • 1 medium egg, beaten



HOW-TO

  • Preheat the oven to 200°C (4000°F, Gas Mk.6), and lightly grease and flour a loaf pan.
  • In bowl, mix together all the dry ingredients: flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Mix together thoroughly.
  • Make a well in the centre and add the milk, oil, and egg. Mix together gently until everything is just combined: no over-mixing!
  • Pour the mixture into the prepared baking tin, and bake in the centre of the preheated oven for 45 minutes to an hour, depending on doneness. Check for doneness at the 45 minute mark by poking a skewer into the thickest part of the bread, and if it comes out clean the bread is done. If it comes out sticky, continue to cook for another 10 minutes.
  • Once cooked, allow to cool in the tin on a wire rack for about 10 minutes before turning out gently and cooling completely on the rack.
  • Enjoy in slices with butter, or jam.

Seeing as we ate this over the course of three days, I actually don't know how long it keeps generally. However, it was still good on day three! I recommend keeping this in an airtight container and enjoying within a week.

THIS TIME IN 2016: No recipe
THIS TIME IN 2015: Dessert Mashup: Millionaire's Shortbread Ice-Cream (Egg and Wheat Free)
THIS TIME IN 2014: No recipe

2 comments:

  1. Mmmm - I've always wanted to try cornbread :) I've heard of it being served as the starchy, carb accompaniment to chilli sometimes. Maybe we should have a chilli and cornbread night sometime soon!! ;D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed! I think it could be a good idea :3 Although, if I were to make it for chili, I'd probably halve the sugar, because in its current form it'd be like eating chili with Madeira cake XD XD

      Also, we'd need to get some kind of alternative hippie milk for you to make it :3

      Delete

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