Saturday, 6 May 2017

Yeast Risen Cinnamon Rolls (Wheat Free)

Fancy a lazy weekend breakfast treat? Here are some deliciously spicy, soft, and rich cinnamon rolls!


I really, thoroughly enjoy the combination of yeasty, doughy, extra light and fluffy dough and squishy gooey spicy centres found in cinnamon rolls: it's such a pleasing thing to eat. They look really pretty too, and the fluffy sides revealed by breaking the rolls apart is one of the best parts.


In the UK, these buns usually have some dried fruit along with the sugary spicy filling and are called Chelsea buns, but my companion really doesn't like dried fruit. So, this American style take on the spiral bread roll is much more likely to be eaten in our household!


To be honest, I prefer them too: the dried fruit kind of gets in the way of enjoying that ooey-gooey middle bit, especially is it's slathered in buttery, creamy, yet tart icing, like a yoghurt or cream cheese glaze.

INGREDIMENTS 
For 8 cinnamon rolls 

For the icing
  • 4 ounces (115 grammes) icing sugar
  • 1 ounce (30 grammes) very soft butter
  • Plain natural yoghurt, buttermilk, or milk to mix

METHOD 

  • Prepare the dough as instructed, and allow to rise. Grease a 11 by 7 inch (28 by 18 centimetre) rectangular dish, or any other similar size.
  • When the dough is nicely puffed up and doubled in size, roll it out on a lightly floured work surface until it becomes a rectangle just under half an inch (1 centimetre) thick. 
  • Spread the soft butter over the whole surface of the dough, except for an inch (2 centimetres) on one of the long sides. Butter it like you'd be generously buttering toast, but don't drown the surface in it: you don't want the rolls to be greasy, there should just be enough to allow the sugar to stick.
  • In a cup or bowl, mix up the sugars and cinnamon. Sprinkle the sugar over the buttered surface until it forms a sandy surface. Make sure the sugar distribution is nice and even.
  • Slightly wet the un-sugared long side of the dough, and roll from the fully sugared long side to the wet long side, making a loose but snug roly-poly: if you roll it too tightly, the buns will grow noses in the oven, because the tightly rolled middle will have nowhere to go but up! Pinch the join well.
  • Cut the big cinnamon sausage into 8 pieces, and then place cut side up into the dish, only barely touching each other.
  • Cover, and leave to rise for about 20 to 30 minutes, or until increased by a half or so. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 180ºC (350ºF, Gas Mk.4). 
  • Once they are puffed, and the oven preheated, place the dish in the oven on the centre shelf for 30 minutes, or until deliciously golden brown.
  • While the buns are cooking, make the icing. Cream together the butter and the icing sugar until smooth and clump free. Mix into a glaze with some yoghurt, buttermilk, or milk to make a thick but running glaze.
  • Remove from the oven, and cool for 5 minutes before drizzling the glaze over the buns while still warm.
TIP
If you want to eat these first thing in the morning, but don't want to get up early to make the dough, you can make these the night before. Prepare the cinnamon rolls right up to the point that you arrange them in the dish, and then wrap tightly with cling film. Pop in the fridge overnight, and then in the morning put them straight from the fridge into the cold oven, then turn it on. The buns will rise while the oven is preheating, and in 40 to 45 minutes you'll have delicious breakfast cinnamon rolls!


Best eaten on the day they are made. If there are leftovers, eat within three days, or freeze for up to 2 months.

THIS TIME IN 2016:  Milky Ice Pops: Chocolate Flavour (Naturally Gluten Free; Dairy-Free Option)
THIS TIME IN 2015: Battenberg Birthday Cake (Wheat and Dairy Free)
THIS TIME IN 2014: American Style Pancakes... also known as drop scones, ssh. (Wheat Free)
THIS TIME IN 2013: Cake Pops, a Maiden Voyage: Jaffa Cake Pops

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