Wednesday, 17 May 2017

Kitchen Experiment: DIY Bundt Tin

Time for another one of my kitchen experiments, and this time it's an equipment trial. This was my last minute fix for a DIY Bundt tin.


 You can't move a pace on Pinterest without running into a ring shaped cake. Some of them are plain with straight sides, some are even square, and then others are made in beautifully ornate tins, some of which are heirloom items. Once the Germans brought the ring cake to America, it took on a whole life of its own.

However, the rung shaped cake tins can be incredibly expensive, or difficult to find. Especially here in Ireland, where the only walk in cake supply shops are in major cities, or sometimes not at all; for example, there isn't one in Limerick since it closed down in February.


So, what's a girl to do?

I thought'd I'd experiment with ways of making a traditional round cake tin into a ring tin by putting things in the middle. The first thing I tried was a glass, but it wasn't very effective: the crust from inside the hole came off on the glass.

I then tried an empty can, washed and dried thoroughly with all labels removed, and filled it with rice to hold it in place. I greased everything really well, and this method worked much better. Even though the inside crust still didn't fully form, it was much straighter and easier to get out.




In both attempts, the hole never properly crusted. I wonder if it has something to do with the rice weights: maybe the heat can't flow through the centre tube well enough when it's full of rice. A quick trip onto the aforementioned Pinterest shows that a crustless hole is no big deal: there's many a Bundt and tube cake without an interior crust.


Eating a cake in the shape of a ring is a novelty, but it doesn't really change the flavour or texture than much. I do understand that some kinds of cake mixture bake better in a tube pan, where the centre doesn't stay soggy. But, to me, this is merely a novelty.


Maybe I'll try this technique to make a nice German kugelhopf, which is a yeast risen ring shaped cake.

No blogs on this day in previous years.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Báirín Breac, a.k.a. Barm Brack: Traditional Irish Fruit Bread

Hallowe'en as a holiday originates in Ireland: Oíche Shamhna was the original Gaelic new year's eve, where the division bet...