Monday, 24 July 2017

Ice-Cream Month: Tiramisù Ice-Cream (Wheat Free)

Ti piace il gelato? Hai un gelato tiramisico!

 

Granted, this isn't actually proper gelato, but I love me some tiramisù! I've made a few tiramisù inspired desserts on this blog, mostly involving cheesecakes, because it's one of my favourite muses: the combination of cheesecake-like cream, sponge cake, coffee and chocolate is just right for me. It's a decadent creamy treat, with a kick.

I first made tiramisù inspired ice-cream about four years ago for a Dutch friend, but it never made it to the blog because we ate it all. So, in honour of Ice-Cream Month, I thought I'd make it again.


This one went a bit pear shaped because the cream didn't whip up right for me this time: I think my ingredients were too warm. It still tasted amazing, but didn't layer and swirl as well as I might have liked. As such, I will reiterate that it's imperative that your ingredients are all cold! That way you'll get lovely fluffsome ice-cream that'll stay super soft in the freezer.


This also uses some yoghurt for sourness, and mixed in equal proportions with icing sugar it can replace some of the condensed milk in your recipe. Although, to maintain the silky texture, never replace more than half of the condensed milk.

INGREDIMENTS
Makes about 2 pints (about a litre) of ice-cream

For the ice-cream base

  • 16 UK fluid ounces (455 millilitres) whipping cream
  • 10 UK fluid ounces (285 millilitres) condensed milk
  • 2 ounces (55 grammes) Greek yoghurt
  • 2 ounces (55 grammes) icing sugar
  • 2 teaspoons (10 millilitres) instant espresso powder
  • 2 teaspoons (10 millilitres) vanilla essence
To assemble,
  • 1 medium egg, separated
  • 1 ounce (30 grammes) caster sugar
  • 1 ounce (30 grammes) white spelt flour, sifted
  • 2 teaspoons (10 millilitres) sunflower oil
  • Chocolate syrup, for assembly
  • Optional: white rum, for sprinkling
Instead of making sponge cakes, you can just use shop-bought trifle sponges. I make my own because I can't buy wheat-free trifle sponges in Ireland.

METHOD

First, make the sponge cakes.
  • Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F, Gas Mk.7), and line a flat tray with non-stick baking paper.
  • In a large mixing bowl, beat the egg whites to soft peaks. Gradually add in the sugar while beating until you have a glossy meringue that holds stiff peaks.
  • Beat in the yolk and oil, then switch to a metal spoon to fold in the flour. Be sure to fold it in completely.
  • Spoon little blobs of cake mixture onto the baking paper, tap the tray on the work surface a few times, and then bake on the centre shelf of the preheated oven for 8 to 10 minutes. The cakes will be done when they are an even golden brown, and springy to the touch.
  • Allow to cool completely before assembling the ice-cream. If you like, you can sprinkle them gently with some white rum, but this is completely optional.

Then, make the ice-cream base.
  • In a measuring jug big enough to hold a UK pint (570 millilitres), mix together the Greek yoghurt and icing sugar until it becomes flowing and smooth. Top up the yoghurt mixture up to 12 UK fluid ounces (340 millilitres) with condensed milk. You might have some condensed milk leftover, so use that for another project.
  • In a large mixing bowl, beat the cream to soft peaks. Fold in the yoghurt and condensed milk mixture and the vanilla essence, then continue to beat until it hold medium peaks.
  • Divide the mixture in two: leave one part plain, and into the other part fold the espresso powder.
Now, assemble the masterpiece.
  • In a two-pint (1 litre) pudding basin, layer the ice-cream bases with crumbled cakes and chocolate syrup as you want. Once layered, swirl with a knife to marble the layers, and then decorate the top with more crumbled cake and chocolate syrup.
  • Cover with the lid or some cling film and freeze for at least 6 hours, or overnight.

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