Friday, 13 May 2016

Chocolate Biscuit Cake, a.k.a: Rocky Road

Chocolate biscuit cake is a recipe that everyone's mother has a recipe for: it's literally a matter of cobbling together the ends of bags of sweets and biscuits from around the house and melting them together. As simple a treat as it is, it's enjoyed by adults and children alike.


However, usually it's as hard as rock and takes a lot of biting, so I made sure that with this batch I made it a tad softer. When you leave it for a few days, everything settles in and it become softer, and way too easy to eat.

I made this batch for visiting my friends in Roscommon over last weekend, because it was requested. I made sure to make the top all prettiful for them.

FREE FROM
☑ Soya (check for soya lecithin)
☑ Yeast
☑ Wheat
☑ Nuts
☑ Eggs

CONTAINS
☒ Gluten (unless you buy gluten free biscuits)
☒ Dairy (dairy substitutes can be found in italics)
☒ Refined sugar products


INGREDIMENTS


To fill a 10 inch (25 centimetre) square tin,
  • 9 ounces (250 grammes) milk or dark chocolate, broken up into pieces
  • 6 ounces (170 grammes) condensed milk
  • 2 ounces (55 grammes) butter
  • 8 ounces (225 grammes) plain biscuits, broken into chunks, get gluten free ones if you have to
  • 4 ounces (115 grammes) mini marshmallows, or cut up marshmallows
  • 4 ounces (115 grammes) sweets or dried fruit of your choice
  • Some sweets and sprinkles for decorating

HOW-TO
  • In a heatproof bowl over a pan of simmering water, melt together the chocolate, condensed milk, and butter, stirring constantly. I would not recommend using a microwave for this.
  • Once the mixture has melted into a thick fudgy consistency, stir in all the remaining ingredients.
  • Pour the mixture into the tin and smooth out with the spoon. Sprinkle some sweets and sprinkle on top, pressing them in a bit with your fingers.
  • Chill in the fridge for at least 2 hours before cutting and serving.

This is great for parties because it's cheap and cheerful, and very adaptable: you can put pretty much anything into it...

No comments:

Post a Comment

Báirín Breac, a.k.a. Barm Brack: Traditional Irish Fruit Bread

Hallowe'en as a holiday originates in Ireland: Oíche Shamhna was the original Gaelic new year's eve, where the division bet...